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Wheel of Testing Part 3 - Applications

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Leeds Testing Atelier V

We did it again. Another punk, free, independent Leeds Testing Atelier happened on the 17th October 2017. Thats number five for those of you counting wristbands.

The technology sector in Leeds grows constantly, with big companies like Sky and Skybet having a massive presence in the city. However, Leeds has always had a strong DIY scene for music and the arts, we want to maintain that in our tech scene too. This is what we hope will make us and keep us different. Our venue is a place where other groups meet, to make music, discuss social issues or advocate for the environment. To be part of that community matches our mission and our hopes for tech in Leeds. There have been other blogs inspired by the day, so we will reflect on some of the positives we encountered and challenges experienced.


WinningWe had 3 brand new speakers on show. Chris Warren, Jenny Gwilliam and Richie Lee were all doing their very first public talk. Chris was even doing his first public talk on his first attendance …

The Team Test for Testability

You know what I see quite a lot. Really long-winded test maturity models. 

You know what I love to see? Really fast, meaningful ways to build a picture of your teams current state and provoke a conversation about improvement. The excellent test improvement card game by Huib Schoots and Joep Schuurkes is a great example. I also really like 'The Joel Test' by Joel Spolsky, a number of questions you can answer yes or no to to gain insight into their effectiveness as a software development team.

I thought something like this for testability might an interesting experiment, so here goes:

If you ask the team to change their codebase do they react positively?Does each member of the team have access to the system source control?Does the team know which parts of the codebase are subject to the most change?Does the team collaborate regularly with teams that maintain their dependencies?Does the team have regular contact with the users of the system?Can you set your system into a given state…

Wheel of Testing Part 2 - Content

Thank you Reddit, while attempting to find pictures of the earths core, you surpass yourself.
Turns out Steve Buscemi is the centre of the world.

Anyway. Lets start with something I hold to be true. My testing career is mine to shape, it has many influences but only one driver. No one will do it for me. Organisations that offer a career (or even a vocation) are offering something that is not theirs to give. Too much of their own needs get in the way, plus morphing into a badass question-asker, assumption-challenger, claim-demolisher and illusion-breaker is a bit terrifying for most organisations. Therefore, I hope the wheel is a tool for possibilities not definitive answers, otherwise it would just be another tool trying to provide a path which is yours to define.


In part one, I discussed why I had thought about the wheel of testing in terms of my own motivations for creating it, plus applying the reasoning of a career in testing to it. As in, coming up with a sensible reflection of real…

Independent, Punk, Leeds Testing Atelier IV

On Tuesday 9th May 2017, we did it again, the fourth iteration of the Testing Atelier rocked the mighty city of Leeds. 
We try to do things a little different. 
Our venue Wharf Chambers is different, a community run venue rather than stuffy conference halls or meeting rooms. We wanted to present a different type of event too as many testing conferences are mainly testers talking about testing that testers do. We wanted to show testing as an activity though, something that all roles do in their own way and how those fit together. To this end, we sourced speakers, workshop facilitators and panelists from loads of roles, developers, ops, build engineers, product all contributed. In fact we had pretty much a 50/50 split between testers and other roles. Winning.

#Testatelier#Leeds The testers have taken over the 3 ways of #DevOps! Here's the third way... pic.twitter.com/V95nTLzQpj — AlexC (@smileandeliver) May 9, 2017As well as having more from all those roles who have a stake in testing a…

The Four Hour Tester - Modelling as a Team Exercise

A few weeks ago, myself and a few colleagues embarked on the Four Hour Tester exercises, starting with the skills of interpretation.

As promised we have attempted the second exercise, modelling. Modelling for me is one of the key testing skills, especially if you don't wish to rendered inert when there are no 'requirements' or 'documentation.' Making our models explicit is also critical, we all carry around our models of a product, system or process in our headers, and when externalised, can raise new questions, both of our own understanding, and as a wider group.

The essence of the exercise was to take three tours from Michael Kelly's FCC CUTS VIDS touring heuristic, specifically:
Users TourData TourConfiguration TourAnd go exploring!
Anyway, we grouped ourselves up and had go, with one slight change, instead of Google Calendar we used the deeply insane Ling's Cars website! Here's what we came up with:

Notes (rough) from our Lings Cars session this aft:
User…

The Four Hour Tester - Interpretation as a Team Exercise

I do hope that everyone has heard about the Four Hour Tester by now. A fascinating experiment by Helena Jeret-Mäeand Joep Schuurkes, distilling the key skills in testing into a set of exercises over 4 hours. This resonated with me, I enjoy thought exercises where you reduce something down to what you believe to be critical, really making choices and having to let go of previously unrealised biases and assumptions.

After seeing the model demonstrated at TestBash Manchester last year, I thought it would be beneficial for me to gather my colleagues, pair up and attempt the first exercise, "Interpretation":

http://www.fourhourtester.net/exercises/Interpretation.html

Essentially, come up with as many interpretations of the second sentence of the following paragraph:
“You can add reminders in Google Calendar. Reminders carry over to the next day until you mark them as done. For example, if you create a reminder to make a restaurant reservation, you’ll see the reminder each day until y…